Poly Mags

Articles and pictures from the Polytechnic Magazine, published 1878-1970, and held at the University of Westminster Archives. The full digitized version can be viewed at http://westuni.websds.net/
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June 1957 “THE FERRY-WRECKERS” from left to right coming down steps—Ann, Pinky, Eileen,Margaret, Anne, Sylvia, Ann, Janet, Peter, Nadine, and sideswomen Libby and Sue.

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June 1957 “THE FERRY-WRECKERS” from left to right coming down steps—Ann, Pinky, Eileen,
Margaret, Anne, Sylvia, Ann, Janet, Peter, Nadine, and sideswomen Libby and Sue.

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THE POLYTECHNIC MAGAZINE MAY, 1953Easter Climbing in North Wales
The newly formed Rock-Cllmbing andMountaineering Club held its first holidaymeet during the first week of the EasterVacation. Nine members assembled at theCapel Curig Youth Hostel on Saturday,March 28th, Wales greeting us with a notun-typical downpour. However, the nextday was clear and by the time we hadtrudged over to Tryfan the rocks had driedout nicely. Easy climbing was enjoyed on theMilestone Buttress and North Gully.Monday, we moved on to Idwal CottageWe had hoped, whilst at Snowdon Ranger,to get in some climbing on Clogwyn d’urArddu, but on Good Friday morning wefound it mainly ice-bound, so continued tothe top of Snowdon itself. However, laterin the day, after enjoying to the full thecombination of bright sun and crisp snow onY Wyddfa and Crib y Ddisgl some of usmade an easy ascent on ’ Cloggy’s ’ westermostarete.Despite the somewhat variable weatherwhere we spent three nights. The weatherwas mixed and some snow fell; however,there were enough of the ’ bright intervals ‘beloved of climbers and B.B.C. announcers,for several rather more difficult climbs tobe accomplished on the Gribin and GlyderFach.We then moved on to Snowdon Rangervia Twll Du and Llanbersi, subjecting theDevils’ Kitchen to a detailed inspectionen route. The famous climb up the left wallhad reluctantly to be ruled out, being waterloggedfor the most part.the climbing itself proved very successful,Kekwick, Gair, Harris and Fry showingthemselves to be capable leaders on the rope.In fact I hear that boots are even nowbeing oiled in readiness for the next trip.Those taking part were: R. L. Williams(Staff); Miss P. Lee, Miss M. Eberhardt,B. Kekwick, H. Gair, D. Harris, R. Hodge,G. Doughty (Students), W. Fry (Institute).

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THE POLYTECHNIC MAGAZINE MAY, 1953
Easter Climbing in North Wales


The newly formed Rock-Cllmbing and
Mountaineering Club held its first holiday
meet during the first week of the Easter
Vacation. Nine members assembled at the
Capel Curig Youth Hostel on Saturday,
March 28th, Wales greeting us with a not
un-typical downpour. However, the next
day was clear and by the time we had
trudged over to Tryfan the rocks had dried
out nicely. Easy climbing was enjoyed on the
Milestone Buttress and North Gully.
Monday, we moved on to Idwal Cottage
We had hoped, whilst at Snowdon Ranger,
to get in some climbing on Clogwyn d’ur
Arddu, but on Good Friday morning we
found it mainly ice-bound, so continued to
the top of Snowdon itself. However, later
in the day, after enjoying to the full the
combination of bright sun and crisp snow on
Y Wyddfa and Crib y Ddisgl some of us
made an easy ascent on ’ Cloggy’s ’ westermost
arete.
Despite the somewhat variable weather
where we spent three nights. The weather
was mixed and some snow fell; however,
there were enough of the ’ bright intervals ‘
beloved of climbers and B.B.C. announcers,
for several rather more difficult climbs to
be accomplished on the Gribin and Glyder
Fach.
We then moved on to Snowdon Ranger
via Twll Du and Llanbersi, subjecting the
Devils’ Kitchen to a detailed inspection
en route. The famous climb up the left wall
had reluctantly to be ruled out, being waterlogged
for the most part.
the climbing itself proved very successful,
Kekwick, Gair, Harris and Fry showing
themselves to be capable leaders on the rope.
In fact I hear that boots are even now
being oiled in readiness for the next trip.
Those taking part were: R. L. Williams
(Staff); Miss P. Lee, Miss M. Eberhardt,
B. Kekwick, H. Gair, D. Harris, R. Hodge,
G. Doughty (Students), W. Fry (Institute).

uniwestminsterarchives:

August 1924. Visit of the Engineering Society to the Lyons factory.
The Greenford works of Messrs. Lyons & Co., are builtand conducted on the modern ” model ” system, where considerableattention is paid to the conditions under which theemployees work, and to their general welfare.When tea is sent from the East, it is shipped up to the Company’sdock via the Grand Junction Canal, and enters theBond house, to be drawn when the import duty is paid.The tasters decide upon the blending, and the varieties arethen mixed and again tasted. If passed, the tea is put intosacks ready for feeding into the hoppers of the packing machines.These machines combine packet-making and filling; thepaper is cut, folded, and stuck; the tea is automaticallyweighed and dropped into the packet, and the whole sealed,labels being put on either by an extension of the machine, orby another machine.In the cocoa section, the oil extracted from the nibs is separatedinto cocoa powder and cocoa butter, the whole operationcarried out by machinery.The chocolate again is mechanically mixed and, in the caseof bars the shallow trays forming the moulds travel -along ashaking band, when they cool sufficiently to be handled andare then removed, the finished bars being shaken out of thetrays and packed.In the case of coating chocolate, this is spread over metaltables in a room kept uniformly at the temperature at whichthe chocolate has the correct plasticity and the centres arehand-dipped.After a tour of the various confectionery departments theSociety was entertained to tea by the Company, thusconcluding a most successful visit.

uniwestminsterarchives:

August 1924. Visit of the Engineering Society to the Lyons factory.

The Greenford works of Messrs. Lyons & Co., are built
and conducted on the modern ” model ” system, where considerable
attention is paid to the conditions under which the
employees work, and to their general welfare.
When tea is sent from the East, it is shipped up to the Company’s
dock via the Grand Junction Canal, and enters the
Bond house, to be drawn when the import duty is paid.
The tasters decide upon the blending, and the varieties are
then mixed and again tasted. If passed, the tea is put into
sacks ready for feeding into the hoppers of the packing machines.
These machines combine packet-making and filling; the
paper is cut, folded, and stuck; the tea is automatically
weighed and dropped into the packet, and the whole sealed,
labels being put on either by an extension of the machine, or
by another machine.
In the cocoa section, the oil extracted from the nibs is separated
into cocoa powder and cocoa butter, the whole operation
carried out by machinery.
The chocolate again is mechanically mixed and, in the case
of bars the shallow trays forming the moulds travel -along a
shaking band, when they cool sufficiently to be handled and
are then removed, the finished bars being shaken out of the
trays and packed.
In the case of coating chocolate, this is spread over metal
tables in a room kept uniformly at the temperature at which
the chocolate has the correct plasticity and the centres are
hand-dipped.
After a tour of the various confectionery departments the
Society was entertained to tea by the Company, thus
concluding a most successful visit.

uniwestminsterarchives:

April 1904
On Sunday 8th Mav the Rev. C. T. Collyer will touchupon the subject of Foreign Missions and deal with theKingdom of Korea. I hope in due course to publish asyllabus of what Mr. Collyer proposes to tell us aboutthis hermit nation. Korea being the centre of so muchattention at this time it would be doubly interesting for us tohear of the life, customs, habits and religion of its people.

uniwestminsterarchives:

April 1904

On Sunday 8th Mav the Rev. C. T. Collyer will touch
upon the subject of Foreign Missions and deal with the
Kingdom of Korea. I hope in due course to publish a
syllabus of what Mr. Collyer proposes to tell us about
this hermit nation. Korea being the centre of so much
attention at this time it would be doubly interesting for us to
hear of the life, customs, habits and religion of its people.

January 1914
Olympic Field Events.
A small but interested gathering was present in Room No. 34
on Tuesday evening, December 16th, to hear Mr. F. A. M.
Webster’s lecture on the necessity of finding men to take up
Field Events in connection with the Olympic Games at Berlin
in 1916.
This lecture was preliminary to the formation of a class, to
which Mr. Webster has kindly promised to be Honoraiy
Advisor. Mr. Studd has kindly promised to find the necessary
apparatus, viz. : Poles for the jumps, Hurdles, Shots, etc. A
start will be made in the Gymnasium on January 7th, at 7 p.m.,
and any member of the Institute who is interested is invited to
meet Mr. Webster there on that date.

January 1914

Olympic Field Events.

A small but interested gathering was present in Room No. 34

on Tuesday evening, December 16th, to hear Mr. F. A. M.

Webster’s lecture on the necessity of finding men to take up

Field Events in connection with the Olympic Games at Berlin

in 1916.

This lecture was preliminary to the formation of a class, to

which Mr. Webster has kindly promised to be Honoraiy

Advisor. Mr. Studd has kindly promised to find the necessary

apparatus, viz. : Poles for the jumps, Hurdles, Shots, etc. A

start will be made in the Gymnasium on January 7th, at 7 p.m.,

and any member of the Institute who is interested is invited to

meet Mr. Webster there on that date.

August 1908
One feature in the Olympic Games stands out with considerable
prominence from a Poly point of view, viz., the ioo
Kilometres Cycle Race, in which our two Poly boys Bartlett and
Denny, came in first and second. The circumstance of the race
will still be fresh in all memories, but the kindly way in which
H. L. Young, the Canadian, enabled first Denny and then
Bartlett to recover their places amongst the leaders after
they had punctured, made an immense impression upon the
crowds of spectators, and not least upon Poly folk. In connection
with this incident, I think members will be glad to
read the following correspondence :—
"July 20th, 1908.
"Dear Mr. Young,—I must send you a line to thank you
for the splendid services you rendered to our Poly boys on
Saturday, for though those services were rendered primarily
to England, yet, as head of the Poly, I cannot refrain from
thanking you on behalf of that Institute as well. But for
your continued help, I fear neither Bartlett nor Denny might
have been able to recover the ground they had lost, and we
shall ever remember with gratitude the splendid assistance you
gave us in our hour of need.
" I hope you will accept a silver medal which I am having
engraved, and which I will forward to you in due course.
I trust that whenever you are over on this side, you will make
the Poly your headquarters, and consider yourself always one
of us.”
The silver medal of the Institute was engraved as follows :
" Awarded to H. L. Young for invaluable services rendered’ to
the Poly in the 100 Kilo Cycle Race at the Stadium, July 18th,
1908, Olympic Games, London.”
"July 22nd, 1908..
"Dear Sir,—1 desire to acknowledge your letter of recent
date, and its sentiments of kindness and appreciation: ’ ‘
"Most cordially do I regard your valued recognition Of t he
aid I gave and which you are pleased to speak of in such kindly
words.
" While I cherish this esteemed reminder of my services,
allow me to assure you that it gave me the greatest pleasure
to share in any way in an event which brought such distinction
to England and the Polytechnic.
" I especially welcomed this opportunity of rendering
assistance to England and thereby strengthening those bonds
of mutual regard and fellowship in which we should hold each
other.—Yours, &c.
" H . L. YOUNG."

August 1908

One feature in the Olympic Games stands out with considerable

prominence from a Poly point of view, viz., the ioo

Kilometres Cycle Race, in which our two Poly boys Bartlett and

Denny, came in first and second. The circumstance of the race

will still be fresh in all memories, but the kindly way in which

H. L. Young, the Canadian, enabled first Denny and then

Bartlett to recover their places amongst the leaders after

they had punctured, made an immense impression upon the

crowds of spectators, and not least upon Poly folk. In connection

with this incident, I think members will be glad to

read the following correspondence :—

"July 20th, 1908.

"Dear Mr. Young,—I must send you a line to thank you

for the splendid services you rendered to our Poly boys on

Saturday, for though those services were rendered primarily

to England, yet, as head of the Poly, I cannot refrain from

thanking you on behalf of that Institute as well. But for

your continued help, I fear neither Bartlett nor Denny might

have been able to recover the ground they had lost, and we

shall ever remember with gratitude the splendid assistance you

gave us in our hour of need.

" I hope you will accept a silver medal which I am having

engraved, and which I will forward to you in due course.

I trust that whenever you are over on this side, you will make

the Poly your headquarters, and consider yourself always one

of us.”

The silver medal of the Institute was engraved as follows :

" Awarded to H. L. Young for invaluable services rendered’ to

the Poly in the 100 Kilo Cycle Race at the Stadium, July 18th,

1908, Olympic Games, London.”

"July 22nd, 1908..

"Dear Sir,—1 desire to acknowledge your letter of recent

date, and its sentiments of kindness and appreciation: ’ ‘

"Most cordially do I regard your valued recognition Of t he

aid I gave and which you are pleased to speak of in such kindly

words.

" While I cherish this esteemed reminder of my services,

allow me to assure you that it gave me the greatest pleasure

to share in any way in an event which brought such distinction

to England and the Polytechnic.

" I especially welcomed this opportunity of rendering

assistance to England and thereby strengthening those bonds

of mutual regard and fellowship in which we should hold each

other.—Yours, &c.

" H . L. YOUNG."

August 1908

Athletics, and the Olympic Games in particular, have
absorbed most of our attention this past month. In any case,
this would have been true, but far more is it so owing to the
prominent part that the Poly were asked to take first of all in
arranging for the competitors’ accommodation, then in organising
the opening procession, in stewarding the Stadium, providing
gymnastic displays, arranging and carrying through
the Marathon Race, and finally assisting in the Prize Distribution.
The Poly and its members were very intimately associated
with the games, and their efforts were very widely
praised and acknowledged.
Our hearty congratulations to Jack Andrew on the splendid
arrangements, he and those working with him made for the
Marathon Race. The Poly, and indeed, the Olympic Games,
owe a great debt to Jack for the days and nights of hard work
he has devoted to the games and athletics. It is given to
many to work hard, but to few to see so satisfactory a result of
their labour. It is high time Jack had a rest, and I am glad
to think that he and his wife and daughter will be spending a
fortnight under the Poly flag in Scotland. If that does not
re-energise him, I know “nothing that will do so.
The crowd which lined the course of the Marathon Race
from start to finish was far beyond expectation, and but for
the splendid services of the police, it would have been
impossible to have kept a clear track for the competitors.

August 1908

Athletics, and the Olympic Games in particular, have

absorbed most of our attention this past month. In any case,

this would have been true, but far more is it so owing to the

prominent part that the Poly were asked to take first of all in

arranging for the competitors’ accommodation, then in organising

the opening procession, in stewarding the Stadium, providing

gymnastic displays, arranging and carrying through

the Marathon Race, and finally assisting in the Prize Distribution.

The Poly and its members were very intimately associated

with the games, and their efforts were very widely

praised and acknowledged.

Our hearty congratulations to Jack Andrew on the splendid

arrangements, he and those working with him made for the

Marathon Race. The Poly, and indeed, the Olympic Games,

owe a great debt to Jack for the days and nights of hard work

he has devoted to the games and athletics. It is given to

many to work hard, but to few to see so satisfactory a result of

their labour. It is high time Jack had a rest, and I am glad

to think that he and his wife and daughter will be spending a

fortnight under the Poly flag in Scotland. If that does not

re-energise him, I know “nothing that will do so.

The crowd which lined the course of the Marathon Race

from start to finish was far beyond expectation, and but for

the splendid services of the police, it would have been

impossible to have kept a clear track for the competitors.

December 1888
SHAKESPEARE CLASS.—Under the direction of Mr. S. L.Hasluck. New term commences Saturday, January 5th. Thisclass (a branch of the Polytechnic School of Elocution) meets everySaturday afternoon, from four till six, throughout the year, and hasnow been in existence more than two years, during which time themembers have studied “Hamlet,” ” Merchant of Venice,” ” Macbeth,”" As You Like It," " Romeo and Juliet," and "Much AdoAbout Nothing.” Students of both sexes will find in this classevery opportunity for acquiring a graceful and effective method ofreading, reciting, and extempore speaking. During the first hour aportion of the play under consideration is read by the Instructorand members, followed by a short | discussion. The second hour isdevoted to readings, recitations, and dramatic scenes by the members.These recitals, etc., which are not confined to Shakespearean.selections, are criticised by the members and Instructor. ” Opennights,” at which recitals, etc., are given by the members, areheld at intervals of six weeks throughout the year. Membershave the privilege of admitting their friends free to these entertainments.Study of the term :—Shakespeare’s comedy ” MuchAdo About Nothing.” For further information apply to the Hon.Sec. A. E. HOPKINS.

December 1888

SHAKESPEARE CLASS.—Under the direction of Mr. S. L.
Hasluck. New term commences Saturday, January 5th. This
class (a branch of the Polytechnic School of Elocution) meets every
Saturday afternoon, from four till six, throughout the year, and has
now been in existence more than two years, during which time the
members have studied “Hamlet,” ” Merchant of Venice,” ” Macbeth,”
" As You Like It," " Romeo and Juliet," and "Much Ado
About Nothing.” Students of both sexes will find in this class
every opportunity for acquiring a graceful and effective method of
reading, reciting, and extempore speaking. During the first hour a
portion of the play under consideration is read by the Instructor
and members, followed by a short | discussion. The second hour is
devoted to readings, recitations, and dramatic scenes by the members.
These recitals, etc., which are not confined to Shakespearean.
selections, are criticised by the members and Instructor. ” Open
nights,” at which recitals, etc., are given by the members, are
held at intervals of six weeks throughout the year. Members
have the privilege of admitting their friends free to these entertainments.
Study of the term :—Shakespeare’s comedy ” Much
Ado About Nothing.” For further information apply to the Hon.
Sec. A. E. HOPKINS.

May 1912
" Titantic " Calamity. Since our last edition one of themost terrible disasters on recordhas taken place, and the sympathies of the whole world havegone out to the sufferers through the sinking of the WhiteStar steamer ” Titanic.” Three only, amongst the missing, were,so far as we know, in any way directly connected with the Poly.One a young member named Louis Desvernin, who joined ourHarriers in September last; another, George Trins, a memberof the band on the “Titanic,” was playing in our orchestra on theSunday before the “Titanic ” sailed ; the third was Mr. Nannini,the father of our members, to whom we extend the utmost sympathy.As a practical expression of our sympathy, a collection wastaken up at the Sunday Service on April 21st, and a box wasplaced in the Entrance Hall for the following five or six days.Money was, in addition, collected in the Day Schools and atBalderton Street. As a result Mr. Studd was able to sendto the ” Titanic ” Disaster Fund being raised by the DailyTelegraph, a cheque for £39 10s. This will be supplemented,as small sums are still being received.

May 1912

" Titantic " Calamity. Since our last edition one of the
most terrible disasters on record
has taken place, and the sympathies of the whole world have
gone out to the sufferers through the sinking of the White
Star steamer ” Titanic.” Three only, amongst the missing, were,
so far as we know, in any way directly connected with the Poly.
One a young member named Louis Desvernin, who joined our
Harriers in September last; another, George Trins, a member
of the band on the “Titanic,” was playing in our orchestra on the
Sunday before the “Titanic ” sailed ; the third was Mr. Nannini,
the father of our members, to whom we extend the utmost sympathy.
As a practical expression of our sympathy, a collection was
taken up at the Sunday Service on April 21st, and a box was
placed in the Entrance Hall for the following five or six days.
Money was, in addition, collected in the Day Schools and at
Balderton Street. As a result Mr. Studd was able to send
to the ” Titanic ” Disaster Fund being raised by the Daily
Telegraph, a cheque for £39 10s. This will be supplemented,
as small sums are still being received.

May 1910
British Antarctic Exhibition, 1910.Many readers of the Polytechnic Magazine will be glad toknow that the boys of the Secondary Day Schools forwardeda subscription of £1o 18s. 9d. towards the British AntarcticExpedition, 1910. This subscription was forwarded with theparticular request that it should be devoted to the purchaseof a Sledge, a Dog and a Sleeping Bag, and also a plate tobe attached to the Sledge to be engraved “From the RegentStreet Polytechnic Secondary Schools.”Captain Scott, R.N., who is commanding the Expedition,in acknowledging the receipt of the subscription writes asfollows :—" Please tell the Boys that I am really delightedwith the interest they have shown in our ventureand will carefully observe their wishes as regardsthe expenditure of their subscription.”

May 1910

British Antarctic Exhibition, 1910.
Many readers of the Polytechnic Magazine will be glad to
know that the boys of the Secondary Day Schools forwarded
a subscription of £1o 18s. 9d. towards the British Antarctic
Expedition, 1910. This subscription was forwarded with the
particular request that it should be devoted to the purchase
of a Sledge, a Dog and a Sleeping Bag, and also a plate to
be attached to the Sledge to be engraved “From the Regent
Street Polytechnic Secondary Schools.”
Captain Scott, R.N., who is commanding the Expedition,
in acknowledging the receipt of the subscription writes as
follows :—
" Please tell the Boys that I am really delighted
with the interest they have shown in our venture
and will carefully observe their wishes as regards
the expenditure of their subscription.”